OVERCUP BLOG — history

Makahiki: The Thanksgiving Most People Don't Know About

Posted by Overcup Marketing on

Makahiki: The Thanksgiving Most People Don't Know About
Native Hawaiians have a similar celebration of Thanksgiving called Makahiki. Through the years, the traditions and festivals have evolved.

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How to Celebrate Bastille Day This Side of the Atlantic

Posted by Olenka Burgess on

How to Celebrate Bastille Day This Side of the Atlantic

"Prise de la Bastille" (Storming of the Bastille) by Jean-Pierre Houël (Public domain courtesy of the National Library of France via Wikimedia Commons) On July 14, 1789, in response to widespread unrest and economic crisis during the rule of Louie XVI, hundreds of French commoners stormed the Bastille prison in Paris. The prison was a symbol of royal authority, so overtaking it sent a clear message to the aristocracy: enough is enough! Although Bastille Day commemorates the beginning of the French Revolution, the whole world likes to join in the party. Down with monarchy! Long live democracy! Here in the...

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No Need to Panic! Get Dad a Gift He’ll Love

Posted by Kaylee Pratt on

No Need to Panic! Get Dad a Gift He’ll Love

Father’s Day wasn’t declared an official nationwide holiday until 1972, which is 58 years after Mother’s Day found a spot on our calendars. So, unless you’ve been stalling for fifty-some-odd years, there’s no need to feel guilty if Dad’s present is a tad delayed. This year, you’d like to send a little something with that greeting card, but he’s already got a “World’s Greatest Dad” mug and a closet full of ties. Dads can be especially tricky to shop for. But don’t worry just yet! Check out some of our titles to see if one of these books will float Dad’s...

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4 Fabulous Ways to Celebrate National Moonshine Day

Posted by Poppy Milliken on

4 Fabulous Ways to Celebrate National Moonshine Day

Believe it or not, June 5th is National Moonshine day, and we couldn’t very well pass by the chance to properly observe a seriously American drink. We’ve clandestinely gathered a little list of ways to celebrate this weekend. Brush up on your moonshine history. The term moonshine comes from the word moonrakers, which was the colloquial name for people from Wiltshire, England. Moonrakers refers to a time when smuggling was a significant industry in the Wiltshire area. According to the story, locals had hidden barrels of brandy from officers by tossing them in a village pond. While raking in their...

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History of the Portland Rum Riot: A Spirit Worth Rioting over

Posted by Poppy Milliken on

History of the Portland Rum Riot: A Spirit Worth Rioting over

On June 2nd, 1855 the working class residents of Portland, Maine discovered their teetotaling mayor Neal Dow was storing $1600 worth of rum inside City Hall. Citizens gathered outside the building that evening expecting to see the arrest of Mayor Dow. What they got instead was a riot that left one man dead, seven others wounded, permanently damaged Dow’s political career, and ultimately led to the end of Maine’s first experiment with temperance in 1856. Perhaps these early entries in the temperance movement are why 21st century Mainers have swung so far to the other side of the aisle. Distiller...

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